Suddenly, the trees burst into bloom.

Suddenly, the trees burst into bloom.

I am trying to be more mindful of getting the Gratitude Sunday posts out each week. I always feel more grounded when I do. Today is a gorgeous day for gratitude. I was also quite pleased to find a quote on gratitude from none other than Casanova! 🙂

Quotes on Gratitude

“It’s wonderful to be grateful. To have that gratitude well out from deep within you and pour out in waves. Once you truly experience this, you will never want to give it up.” — Srikumar Rao

“I have had friends who have acted kindly towards me, and it has been my good fortune to have it in my power to give them substantial proofs of my gratitude.” — Giacomo Casanova

“The discipline of gratitude is the explicit effort to acknowledge that all I am and have is given to me as a gift of love, a gift to be celebrated with joy.” — Henri Nouwen

Gratitude list for the week ending April 11

  1. Getting girl time with my cousin, culminating in seeing the new Cinderella movie. 🙂
  2. My trainer, for helping me get back into shape (even though I am seldom grateful in the middle of the workout!)
  3. Flowering trees, tulips in bloom, green grass, spring in the air
  4. Mother-son bonding time featuring a spaghetti dinner and watching The Empire Strikes Back
  5. Phenomenal 12 x 12 webinar on Picture Book Trends with Susannah Richards!
  6. Being introduced to some new music that has moved me AND my son’s creativity in creating on GarageBand
  7. Luxurious, long conversations spanning everything from the meaning of existence, to poetry, to what’s for dinner
  8. Lovely, vivid, and energizing dreams
  9. Homemade rigatoni with sausage, tomatoes, basil, and mozzerella
  10. I started a new picture book draft this week!

What are you grateful for this week?

Categories: 12 x 12, Cooking, Creativity, Family, Gratitude Sunday, Picture Books, Writing · Tags: , , , , , , ,

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reforemo2

If you write picture books, have you been over to Carrie Charley Brown’s website this month to check out her ReFoReMo (Reading for Research Month) challenge?

If not, head over there NOW and learn from all of the guest educators who have been sharing picture books that inspire their own work. Reading the posts will give you ideas for how to do this type of “reading for research” to inspire and improve your own work.

I am honored to be today’s guest educator. Head on over to learn why I “Delve into the Dark Side” of picture books.

On a separate (but related to picture books) note, Emma Walton Hamilton and I put together a free 7-step checklist for picture book submissions, which you can grab here.

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htwIt’s once again been too long since I’ve posted a Gratitude Sunday. I’m going to TRY even harder to get this in every week.

Quotes on Gratitude

All three of this week’s quotes are from Anne Lamott’s book, HELP, THANKS, WOW, which I received for Christmas.

“…(L)ife can seem like an endless desert of of danger with scratchy sand in your shoes, and yet if we remember or are reminded to pay attention, we find so many sources of hidden water, in a weed or the gravel or a sunrise. There are so many ways to sweep the sand off your feet. So we say, ‘Oh My God. Thanks.”

“You say, Thank you for lifting this corner of the curtain so I can see the truth, maybe for just a moment, but in a way that might change my life forever.”

“Gratitude begins in our hearts and then dovetails into behavior. It almost always makes you willing to be of service, which is where the joy resides. It means you are willing to stop being such a jerk. When you are aware of all that has been given to you, in your lifetime and in the past few days, it is hard not to be humbled, and pleased to give back.”

Gratitude list for the week ending January 10

  1. A real-live editor liked one of my stories that’s on submission and asked for some revisions!
  2. A friend who was willing to talk ad nauseam in my hyper-excited state.
  3. I MADE those revisions yesterday!
  4. I also re-wrote a picture book draft I’d lost after my iPad broke. I like it even better now.
  5. All of the wonderful folks who participated in my 12 Days of Christmas for Writers series. Inspiring way to begin this New Year!
  6. Finally seeing Mockingjay, which ROCKED!
  7. The weather warming up enough to melt the glacier that had become my driveway
  8. Launching 12 x 12 with an interview with Tara Lazar.
  9. Watching the first Indiana Jones movie with the kids
  10. Skyping with a local SCBWI schmooze group in LA

What are you grateful for this week?

Categories: 12 x 12, Gratitude Sunday, Movies, Picture Books, SCBWI, Writing · Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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OMG I JUST realized that today is the last day of 12 x 12 2014!!! Forgive me for allowing this to take me by surprise. I haven’t even had a chance to be sad yet! 

Seriously, the whole month of December has been like this. Christmas was over just as I fully realized it was upon us. Tonight is New Year’s Eve and I made dinner reservations last night. 

Perhaps it’s a form of rebellion against saying goodbye to another OUTSTANDING year of 12 x 12. Yet, I know it’s not truly goodbye. Many of you will come back in 2015. Some of you won’t. But no matter what, I cherish you all and the community we shared this year. I myself wrote 7 new drafts and revised 12. That is a personal best for me in terms of volume of writing, and I know it would never be possible without the support and motivation of this group.

I wish I had something more profound to say, but I always get a little verklempt at this time of year. So, allow me to wish you all a Happy, Safe, Joyous, Prosperous, CREATIVE, New Year!

Please visit our BRAND NEW 12 x 12 website if you are interested in joining next year. See you on the other side!

Now tell us about you. Did you get your draft or revision done this month? Let us know in the comments and in the Rafflecopter. Remember one lucky 12 x 12 member will win a picture book critique from our very own Marcie Colleen.

How did you do this year? If you completed 12 picture book drafts this year, send us a video or a headshot and tell us how many drafts you wrote and we’ll add you to the Winners Wall! Entries for the Winners Wall are due by midnight tonight!

Here is what you need to do to check in for a chance to win a Picture Book Critique from Marcie Colleen:

  1. See the Rafflecopter widget at the end of this post that says “Picture Book Critique from Marcie Colleen” at the top.
  2. Click on the “Comment on the Featured Post” button. It will reveal the task, which is to comment on the featured blog post. Commenting on the featured post is mandatory and gets you one point even if you didn’t complete a draft in December. If you haven’t yet commented, click here to do so. Then you click ENTER on that option in Rafflecopter, which will then open the next two options.
  3. Click on the “Wrote a PB Manuscript” button. This will ask if you completed a PB draft in December. If you did, click ENTER, if you did not, move on to the next step.
  4. Click on the last “Revised a PB Manuscript” button. This will ask if you revised a PB in December. If you did, click ENTER. If not, move on to the next step.
  5. Submit your entry. Rafflecopter will track your points.

You have until midnight Eastern on January 1st to enter your results. Rafflecopter will draw a winner and I’ll announce it on the blog on January 2nd.

Keep on writing! We hope to see you back in 2015!!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Categories: 12 x 12, 12 x 12 Featured Author, Giveaway, Picture Books · Tags: , , , , , ,

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Sign up for 12 Days of Writerly Gifts

Sign up for 12 Days of Writerly Gifts

I’ve been sharing my end-of-year program to thank my fellow writers – 12 Days of Christmas with Julie Hedlund – on social media, but figured I’d best blog about it too. Read on for all the details. Merry Christmas to all who celebrate, and an early Happy New Year to all.

Want to keep the holidays going even after the New Year begins? Want to start your writing year from a place of inspiration, illumination, and optimism?

Sign up for my 12 Days of Christmas email series and you’ll receive a gift from me each day. Short, sweet, inspirational, and no strings attached. Traditionally, the twelve days of Christmas begins on Christmas day, but we’ll start on December 26th and conclude on January 6th.

You’ll receive daily, bite-size surprises such as:

  • Exercises to evaluate and integrate your 2014 writing year so you are ready for 2015
  • Tools to illuminate successes in order to go even further in your writing
  • “Never-before-seen” content from me about the writing life
  • How to treat your writing as a business in 2015 and have FUN while doing so
  • How to keep the fun and whimsy in your life and your writing
  • Resources, Inspiration, Tips, and More!

What you will not find in this email series:

  • Browbeating
  • Lectures
  • Prescriptive programs
  • Sales pitches
  • Recycled content

So come join the fun! The series is open to everyone, everywhere. I hope it is obvious, but you do not have to celebrate Christmas to participate — I’m simply using the tradition of “12 days” to give you some writing gifts that will be more useful than seven swans-a-swimming. 🙂

Subscribe to 12 Days of Christmas with Julie Hedlund

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How DID we make it all the way through November already? As much as I love the holiday season, I’m always a little sad when the end of the 12 x 12 year is nigh. Another year of writing, bonding, supporting, and communing ready to go on the books. But WAIT! We have one more month to go, and it’s going to be a great one, starting with December’s featured author (be sure to come back tomorrow for some special inspiration).

Despite having announced that I did not plan to write any new drafts for the remainder of the year, one of my PiBoIdMo ideas grabbed hold and wouldn’t let go. I wrote a complete draft on the plane to London, where I went to conduct research for a different book. Between coming up with 30 ideas for PiBoIdMo, writing a draft of one of them, completing a major revision on one of my earlier manuscripts and enjoying a hugely productive week of book research in London, I think November was my most productive writing month in 2014 (so far)!

How about you? Did you get your draft or revision done this month? Let us know in the comments and in the Rafflecopter. Remember one lucky 12 x 12 member will win their choice of The Ultimate Guide to Picture Book Submissions or How to Make Money as an Writer. Note: There is a Cyber-Monday sale on both of these courses underway at the moment that will expire at the same time as the Rafflecopter. If you decide to purchase either to get the deal and then you win, you’ll get a full refund. 🙂

Here is what you need to do to check in for a chance to win your choice of:

The Ultimate Guide to Picture Book Submissions or How to Make Money as a Writer

  1. See the Rafflecopter widget at the end of this post that says “Ultimate Guide to Picture Book Submissions” at the top.
  2. Click on the “Comment on the Featured Post” button. It will reveal the task, which is to comment on the featured blog post. Commenting on the featured post is mandatory and gets you one point even if you didn’t complete a draft in November. If you haven’t yet commented, click here to do so. Then you click ENTER on that option in Rafflecopter, which will then open the next two options.
  3. Click on the “Wrote a PB Manuscript” button. This will ask if you completed a PB draft in November. If you did, click ENTER, if you did not, move on to the next step.
  4. Click on the last “Revised a PB Manuscript” button. This will ask if you revised a PB in November. If you did, click ENTER. If not, move on to the next step.
  5. Submit your entry. Rafflecopter will track your points.

You have until midnight Eastern on December 1st to enter your results. Rafflecopter will draw a winner and I’ll announce it on the blog on December 2nd.

Keep on writing!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Categories: 12 x 12, Giveaway, Goals, PiBoIdMo, Travel, Works in Progress, Writing · Tags: , , , , , , , ,

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12 x 12 Member L. Michelle Quraishi

Believe it or not folks, this is our last Tuesday 12 x 12 post for 2014, and what a great one to capture the spirit of our community as we roll from 2014 into 2015. Today’s author, L. Michelle Quraishi, brought tears to my eyes because I saw myself in every part of her journey. I suspect all of you will see yourselves too. Dreams deferred, crushed. Climbing out of the rubble to take hold of them again. (Side note: WHY do so many people get clobbered in college, at the very time teachers should be encouraging young writers the most – UGH!). Then of course, once free of the rubble, a community stretches out its hands. Please welcome L. Michelle Quraishi!

I always thought that what I needed in order to write was an audience. So much writing in me never makes it onto the page unless there’s someone out there waiting to read it. I write MORE when I have a deadline connected to a real person. I joined 12 x 12 because it offered readers and deadlines—a ready-made audience to stand-in for the nurturing agent and editors I have yet to meet.

As a child, finding an audience was easy. My mom typed my stories before I could write them myself, on a real old-fashioned clackety-clack.

© Jorge Royan / http://www.royan.com.ar / CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

© Jorge Royan / http://www.royan.com.ar / CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

My teachers glowed and encouraged when I set pages in their hands. My great-grandmas wrote back to every letter I ever sent them, letters that survived fire and flood, still tied up in bundles in my garage. By the time I was old enough to get in trouble for speckling my dad’s typewriter with white-out (I’ve always loved revising 😉 ), Creative Writing classes and literary journals gave me an outlet and an audience.

And then came college. I loved college, but nobody cared about my writing anymore. I applied and was accepted to the Creative Writing Department, which included the remote but enticing possibility of working with Toni Morrison, an opportunity lost that I’ll never cease to regret. Nothing in my young life as a writer had prepared me to swim with the big fish, and a freshman semester with a scathing graduate student in fiction seminar sent my writing voice scuttling to hide under a rock. I dropped out of Creative Writing and instead majored in English with a focus on children’s literature, to spend three years reading and writing about the children’s books I treasured.

De grote vissen eten de kleine, Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1526/1530–1569)

De grote vissen eten de kleine, Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1526/1530–1569)

I never stopped writing, but my failure to connect to an audience in college put Maleficent’s enchantment on my writing ambition, cursing it to a deep sleep. Ten years of my young adulthood were dedicated to writing about education, as I struggled with the dilemmas urban teachers face in underfunded schools, and took solace in my classroom library of picture books.

 

Louis Sußmann-Hellborn (1828- 1908): Dornröschen - Mutter Erde

Louis Sußmann-Hellborn (1828- 1908): Dornröschen – Mutter Erde

I stopped teaching to stay home with my children, writing in scraps and corners of time stolen from each day. Then, when my youngest turned two, I could see the time looming when the financial contribution I’d been making to our family—childrearing—would have to be replaced with something else. And at that moment in 2012, I determined that the something else would be my writing. Somehow, I would learn to make my way as a writer in the world again. It was my daughter’s promise to grow up that rousted my ambition from sleep.

I went to the Children’s Writers & Illustrators Conference at Book Passage, three years in a row. There I learned about SCBWI, and have attended every local event since. Heard about Tara Lazar’s PiBoIdMo, where I read about 12 x 12, and joined this year for the first time. All along I thought that it was audience I needed. Turns out, what I really needed was community.

I’ve been mostly quiet here in 12 x 12, and feel pretty shy about sending this little essay to Kelli. But I also get pretty choked up when I think about how 12 x 12 has transformed and enlivened my writing life since I joined. I wanted to share my gratitude for those badges, the “Well, done, Michelle,” the thoughtful feedback on 250 words, Query Corner and Pitch Perfect, and the support of my online critique group.

Long ago, I locked myself into a tower where my writing dreams withered. And I rescued myself, too. All it took was putting my hand on the doorknob, and turning it. But when I opened the door, all of you folks at 12 x 12 were right there waiting for me, and you welcomed me as if I already belonged. Thank you.

Born to a Pakistani father and American mother in California, L. Michelle Quraishi was raised in Half Moon Bay, CA, on a balanced diet of donuts and liverwurst, Madeleine L’Engle, and sitar music. She now lives in Walnut Creek, finding inspiration for her books in goddess lore, brain science, animal behavior, her children, calculus and kung fu. Inspired by Julie Hedlund’s How to Make Money as a Writer course, she’s just started work on her author website. You can also find her on Twitter or check out research for her new novel about Baba Yaga in middle school on Pinterest. When she’s not busy making up stories, Michelle blogs at amomnextdoor.wordpress.com, folds origami, collects rainwater in jars, pickles green beans and keeps knives in dangerous places.

 

Categories: 12 x 12, Childhood, Children's Books, Guest Blogging, PiBoIdMo, Picture Books, SCBWI, Writing · Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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12 x 12 Member Lisa Venditelli KarmelWOW did the story from today’s Tuesday 12 x 12 author, Lisa Venditelli Karmel, resonate with me! I, too, have suffered the pain of seeing one of MY books published by someone else – more than once in fact. What kept me going were encouraging words from my writer friends and the fact that inspiration for new ideas is all around. The fact that the 12 x 12 community (and of course the lovely Renee LaTulippe) could do the same for someone else is SO gratifying. This is what it’s all about folks! Please help me welcome Lisa.

I am an artist and an author/illustrator. I’ve been working hard the last couple of years taking classes, joining SCBWI, critique groups, and 12 x12. I felt that I was making steady progress albeit slow at times. I have several stories in progress. One story I thought was really unique and humorous. People in the biz told me so, but I had to work more on the writing. So that is what I was doing.

Then one day a friend wrote me an email asking if it was me they should congratulate. It sounded like my story was getting published. Huh?! My stomach spun and flipped. Was someone trying to get a hold of me? Then my stomach sank like a rock. Someone else was getting “MY STORY!” published. I was devastated. I paced. I shouted. I cried. What can I say? I’m Italian. With the support of my writer friends I learned it has happened to others. You hear everything people have to say to make you feel better – proves it’s a great idea- it means you are on the right track-you politely say “thank you”. But you still hurt. Do you really believe it? At least not right away. You know the expression “you had to kill your darling”? Well I had to bury the whole family.

Luckily, through 12 x 12 and Julie’s testimonial, I had just signed up for Renee LaTullipe’s online class, the Lyrical Language Lab. It started about a week after that happened. The class got me to busily focus on other things and move on. I have learned SO much from Renee. She is a very giving teacher. Her feedback is spot on and plentiful. The course was challenging at times for me and I was working long hours at it. But I can already see the improvement in my writing. I am not so afraid of the rhyme and it has definitely improved my prose. I may not participate in all the “goodies” 12 x 12 has to offer, but it has been a wealth of information, encouragement and guidance through the publishing world.Illustration by Lisa Venditelli Karmel

I guess I’m the eternal optimist. I did hear that the most successful people tend to be optimists because they don’t give up. So I’m hopeful about that. The expressions “shake it off” and “rub dirt in it” really do have some validity. I still can’t even look at the title of my old story without my stomach sinking a bit, but it is a little less painful every time. I am starting to believe all the kind, encouraging support my friends gave me and I thank them. Most importantly, I am still working and you should too!

Lisa Venditelli Karmel is an unpublished author/illustrator and fine artist. She is a part-time professor of Fine Art. She went to RISD for her undergrad, but got away from illustration and stories until the last few years. She received a Masters of Fine Art at Mills College and has shown in many galleries across the country. Having her boys and sharing books with them rekindled her love for picture books, especially humorous ones. You can visit her website and blog at LisaVenditelliKarmel.com. Her fine art can be viewed at Lisavenditelli.com.

Categories: 12 x 12, Books, Children's Books, Guest Blogging, Picture Books, Works in Progress, Writing · Tags: , , , , , , ,

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12 X 12 Member Kaye Baillie I am delighted to bring you another installment of the “How I Got My Agent” series focused on picture book authors. It’s especially rewarding when these stories come about as a result of 12 x 12 submissions. AND, I adore Kaye Baillie’s description of Liza Fleissig and Ginger Harris as having a “zesty attitude.” Truer words might never have been spoken. 🙂 Please welcome Kaye!

How long had you been writing before seeking an agent, and what made you decide it was time to look for one?

In 1998 I’d had enough of being a personal assistant. I decided that what I really wanted to do was write for children so I began a Diploma in Professional Writing and Editing. My favorite subject was definitely writing for children. Towards the end of that year I got married. Then early the next year we moved house and by the end of the year had our first daughter. In 2002 our second daughter was born and I’d have to say, I struggled to get my Diploma finished which I finally did in 2005 via distance education.

I was fortunate that in 2001 and 2004 I had two educational leveled readers published which are still selling to this day. But I really wanted a trade book published. I dabbled with stories and submissions for many years and have to admit I wasn’t really putting in the effort required so had no success. In 2011 I decided to get serious. I began entering competitions, writing more and submitting to publishers more often, going to workshops and seminars and trying to immerse myself in the children’s book world. I was getting some results of highly commended or first prize in competitions and favorable feedback from some Australian publishers for my picture book submissions.

Then in 2013 I discovered a Writer’s Digest Webinar. Hmmm, access to an agent I thought. This could be a good direction as submitting directly to publishers is proving to be unsuccessful. The Webinar was on picture books and the agent running the Webinar would critique our submissions. Well I was shocked when the Agent replied how much she loved my story and would I consider reworking the ending and resubmitting to her. Absolutely! I did this and waited, and waited and waited. She kept in touch with me, each time saying that she would be discussing my story at the next staff meeting.

This went on for months with me nudging in between. In February 2014 I told the Agent that I would now like to submit to agents through Julie’s 12×12. In early April the Agent told me that she would not take on a new author but that one of the other agents in the agency would like to talk to me. I was excited again although still waited to speak to the next agent. Now we were into April. I decided to submit to Ginger Harris of Liza Royce the same story that the Agent had liked. Two things happened at once. The earlier Agent came back to me with an offer of representation AND Ginger had also made an offer.

What kind of research did you do before submitting?

The information on the 12×12 site each month is terrific. I read all links about the agents and Google them also. I also look at the agents through Twitter and try to find out as much as I can about what books they have represented and sold.

The dreaded questions: How many queries? How many rejections?

I ducked across to my Excel spreadsheet and would say that over a four year period, I submitted 9 different manuscripts to publishers in Australia, which totaled about 70 queries. Each of the 9 stories would usually be sent to the same list of publishers. Most of the rejections were standard form letters with only several offering encouraging feedback. After receiving encouragement from the Agent through Writer’s Digest, this is when I really focused on finding an Agent instead of the submission process I had been taking.

Was it difficult to find an agent who wanted to represent an author focusing solely on picture books?

Not really. I have had discussions with three agents in the last few weeks and two of them wanted to see more of my picture books. There was no mention of other genres.

How did you know your agent was “the one”?

Well, to continue on from what I said above, I had the unexpected dilemma about what to do with two offers at the same time. My gut was telling me to go with Ginger and Liza. I was impressed with their swift offer of representation, their friendly style and zesty attitude. We discussed who might be a good publishing fit for my story and I straight away felt like I would be in good hands. I also felt that Liza Royce Agency would be accessible and that we would have regular communications.

If 12×12 helped you in any way during your agent search/development of craft, can you tell us how?

12×12 gives incredible background information on top agents, who we are fortunate to have an opportunity to submit to. I think this is a golden opportunity for authors. Being able to choose between agents each month is not only a privilege, but also is a great learning device that made me think about the differences within agencies and between agents. It is so important to find the right fit and to understand what an agent is looking for. Being able to read discussions and posts from other members leads to wonderful opportunities where we can follow links on craft development. 12×12 really showed me what is possible and then it was up to me to follow those leads.

Has your writing process changed at all since signing with an agent?

As I have only just signed it is hard to say, but I am thinking about my story which the Agent chose to represent and am now using that as a benchmark for future work. I definitely feel that I have to work more solidly and regularly and that ‘Children’s author’ is my actual profession. I will also be preparing to meet deadlines and to put my writing first rather than allowing ‘daily grind’ duties to take over my day.

What advice would you give to picture book writers looking for agents today?

I would say that 12×12 is a glowing opportunity. There is support, shared knowledge and opportunity for authors. Through 12×12 you will learn about agents that you may not have known about (which is what happened to me.) I would also say to learn about pitches and queries. I don’t think they are as complicated as I had thought and once you have them under control, they are easier to send out.

Do you think your platform (blog, social media) helped you find your agent?

Not really. I think it’s in the query and the manuscript. I have used Twitter for a few years and still like it but it did not play a part in me finding an agent. I have a website which I think is a good thing to showcase what you’ve done. Facebook is a nice way to communicate with peers but I don’t think it’s helpful to find an agent. I don’t blog.

Tell us something that is on your “bucket list.” Something you’ve dreamed of doing all your life but have yet to accomplish.

Probably finding the right hairstyle is something I’ve been trying to achieve my whole life and have failed. Something that I have dreamed of doing for many years though is taking a long long train trip across beautiful country-sides and having my own private compartment and I get to dine in the old style dining carriage. I would gaze and write and sip fine wines.

What’s up next/what are you working on now?

I am working on a picture book about one aspect of World War I and I have just come up with a cute idea for another picture book. I seem to have two stories on the go lately as I want to keep up with the 12×12 challenge. I also will be fine tuning my manuscript for Liza Royce agency so they can start submitting – gosh, can hardly believe I’m saying that.

I’m also off to the SCBWI conference in Sydney in July. One of the master-classes I’m taking is run by Connie Hsu of Roaring Brooks.

 

 

 

Categories: 12 x 12, Agents, Authors, Children's Books, Guest Blogging, How I Got My Agent, Picture Books, Queries, SCBWI, Writing · Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

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12 x 12 new banner

There’s a good reason this post is a little late today, and that’s because I spent this morning finishing my October draft! So while I didn’t revise any manuscripts this month, I did write a new one – woo hoo! In fact, my plan for the remaining two months of the year (Two months? Now THAT’S Spooky!), I plan to spend NOT writing new manuscripts but revising the dickens out of several that I already have.

How about you? Did you get your draft or revision done this month? Let us know in the comments and in the Rafflecopter. Special thanks to our featured author Laura Gehl for teaching us how to hook readers with our books. Be sure to stop back tomorrow for a special November treat! Oh, and Happy Halloween!!

Here is what you need to do to check in for a chance to win a Picture Book Pitch Critique with Laura:

  1. See the Rafflecopter widget at the end of this post that says “Picture Book Pitch Critique” at the top.
  2. Click on the “Comment on Laura’s Blog Post” button. It will reveal the task, which is to comment on Laura’s blog post. Commenting on Laura’s post is mandatory and gets you one point even if you didn’t complete a draft in October. If you haven’t yet commented, click here to do so. Then you click ENTER on that option in Rafflecopter, which will then open the next two options.
  3. Click on the “Wrote a PB Manuscript” button. This will ask if you completed a PB draft in October. If you did, click ENTER, if you did not, move on to the next step.
  4. Click on the last “Revised a PB Manuscript” button. This will ask if you revised a PB in October. If you did, click ENTER. If not, move on to the next step.
  5. Submit your entry. Rafflecopter will track your points.

You have until midnight Eastern on November 1st to enter your results. Rafflecopter will draw a winner and I’ll announce it on the blog on November 2nd.

Keep on writing!
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Categories: 12 x 12, 12 x 12 Featured Author, Giveaway, Halloween, Picture Books · Tags: , , , , ,

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